How Do I, Renato, Know that Manny Knows?

Poetry is central to human condition; Manny’s intuition and actions of his birth mother’s death at 14 months old shows exhibits the inherent, intimate spiritual connections shared particularly between mother and child. By Manny’s actions, there’s an implication that something’s wrong. “Manny babbles, saying gibble gibble,/ happily cooing.”, which shows him at peace and then…

On Antropoesia

In his illuminating “Notes on Poetry and Ethnography,” poet and anthropologist Renato Rosaldo articulates his particular poetic approach by coining the term “antropoesia,” a word which bridges the cultural and social scientific fields of poetry and anthropology(105). Antropoesia, or “verse informed by ethnographic sensibility”(105), aspires to, as Rosaldo puts his poetic practice as shown in The Day of…

Keyword Assignment: Naming.

Perhaps it should have been more obvious, something I understood without having to take this course, but I realize now more than ever the ways in which naming plays such a tremendous role in documentary: Naming a person or an object, a place or a time, is a potent symbolic act of definition of identity…it…

Rosaldo’s Voices

A poetic license provides many writers with the freedom to create as they please. Some break from formal writing conventions, others can reshape and reconstruct stories without much regard to dates or actual events. For an artist, this seems absolutely important and typical of the creative process, but how far can a poetic license go…

Anti-Alienation: A modernist reading of “The Day of Shelly’s Death”

Orteya y Gasset can be believed when he attributes to modern art a systematic refusal of all that is ‘human’, i.e., generic, common—as opposed to distinctive, or distinguished—namely, the passions, emotions and feelings which ‘ordinary’ people invest in their ‘ordinary’ lives. —Pierre Bourdieu, from the introduction to Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of…

Rosaldo’s Ventriloquy

Rosaldo begins with a Timeline, but it’s a timeline mixed with past, present and the (apparent) future.  “This fall semeter, we’ll meet with faculty to plan courses and research project. During the spring semester, we will…” We know that everything changes–but at the time he’s writing about, he doesn’t. The timeline is a jarring reminder…